Saturday, June 29, 2013

Now 34 Strange National Park Clusters of Missing Persons Across America

Update:

A third book entitled: “Missing 411-North America and Beyond” by David Paulides is the "first edition that presents missing people and relevant facts from five countries (Australia, England, France, Iceland and Indonesia) outside of North America and examines the parallels between the cases. The book also includes a multitude of new stories from North America.

David Paulides has shined a light onto one of the greatest and most disturbing mysteries of our time: the simple and awful fact that people disappear, especially in our national parks, and little effort is made to find them, let alone inform the public about the danger.

Even when massive searches are mounted, and people are found, the events surrounding their loss and recovery are often far beyond logical explanation.

This is the most comprehensive and expertly presented series of books on the subject ever written, and the latest volume, which includes stories from five countries, is sobering, chilling and far too well researched to ignore. Essential reading."

Lost in Oregon: Hiker's 2012 disappearance joins hundreds of unsolved wilderness cases
A staggering 189 men and 51 women officially remain listed as missing since 1997 by the Oregon Office of Emergency Management after trekking into Oregon's wildest places, said Georges Kleinbaum, search and rescue coordinator for the office.


Former police officer turned investigative journalist, and author of Missing 411, and Missing 411 Eastern US, David Paulides, discovered weird and odd disappearances in U.S. national parks and forests that no one can explain. These isolated missing person cases from National State Parks (NSP) were beginning to form clusters around certain mountainous regions. Sometimes these clusters are purely geographical while others identify a linkage based on age and sex of the victims. Sometimes the only clues left by the missing were their clothes, neatly piled.

In many of the cases, victims appear to travel a vast distance or into a location which should be physically impossible to reach. For instance, a two-year-old boy named Keith Parkins, who vanished near Umatilla National Forest. The child would eventually be found 12 miles away after being gone for only 19 hours. The journey required that the toddler venture over two mountain ranges, as well as fences, creeks, and rivers. This case is just one of many where children disappear and are later found "several hundred percent" outside of the grid system carefully designed by search and rescue teams. Moreover, there are some rare cases where, after tracking dogs have led rescuers to a large river, search teams will explore the other side and "miles away, they find the kid."  Other times, the dogs pick up no scent at all, and give up.

2 comments:

Anonymous,  00:29  

The "Missing 411" books are the most intriguing and factually based writings I've read in years. The author details the circumstances behind the disappearances and then supplies the articles that support the facts. There are many cases from Canada as well as the U.S. The most amazing fact is that the U.S. national park Service states they do not track missing people inside their parks and when the author asks for any data associated with the missing, they want to charge him 1.4 million dollars for them to do their job, unbelievable!! Great book. Go straight to their site for purchase, www.canammisssing.com, don't go to Amazon, they want too much money....

Bob Aussem 15:27  

What park or area in Illinois shows a cluster?

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